How have video games changed our lives?

James HeslipFunLeave a Comment

How have video games changed our lives?

I’m an avid gamer, and I feel lucky to have grown up witnessing this modern age of gaming. With graphics and hardware capabilities at an all time high, story tellers can create an immersive virtual reality and even begin to place the players directly into the game. If this isn’t suitable, they can bring the game into the real world. … Read More

My other life…Crawley Amateur Boxing Club

Jenny HopcraftFunLeave a Comment

Some of you may not be aware but in my spare time, I help run the Crawley Amateur Boxing Club. Crawley Amateur Boxing Club is based in Three Bridges. It is run wholly by volunteers and is a registered charity. My husband Rees is the Chairman. There are around 100 members ranging from eight years old to adults. There are classes held … Read More

Out of the office…well my usual one at least!

Kim KenningtonFun

A slightly flippant remark to my MD when asked what he could do to improve my work experience resulted in a trip with our Finance Manager Jenny, to our other office in… Malmö, Sweden.  I could see this was going to be a great chance to build on my working relationship with Jenny and finally get to see where my … Read More

Rehearsal For Armageddon – The Balkan Wars 1912 – 13

Peter MerrittFunLeave a Comment

The long and bloody history of the Balkans is like any other hotly-contested region of the world, where various groups or states have ‘interests’ which unfortunately (for the general population) overlap… The original hotchpotch of petty feudal states evolved after the fragmentation of the old Roman Empire, and continued a precarious existence on the edge of Europe’s two enormous medieval … Read More

Nudge Theory – What drums do you dance to?

John 'Jake' JacobFunLeave a Comment

A highly popular science book “Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth and Happiness” (Thaler and Sunstein, 2008) is now ten years old. BBC Radio 4 programme “Nudge Nudge” investigates the growing influence of Nudge Theory in government and business (broadcast 8th July and 23rd October 2018). Nudge holds that rather than making decisions on a rational basis, innate behaviours of … Read More

Origins of the QWERTY keyboard layout

James HeslipFunLeave a Comment

I am only human, and with that, I tend to forget things. I find that if I don’t write an important task down, I won’t remember to do until it’s too late. Naturally as a programmer my instinct when it comes to making quick notes is my keyboard, not pen and paper. This all got me thinking, where did the … Read More

A History of Emoji: To celebrate World Emoji Day 2018

Mike MingardFunLeave a Comment

World Emoji Day Celebration Blog - History of Emoji

Today is World Emoji Day! Yes, those yellow smiley faces have their very own day now. But are you interested in the history of Emoji? Where did they come from and who created them? Remember those? Chances are you used one recently 😉 They are a graphical representation of a facial expression using characters (usually involving punctuation marks) numbers and … Read More

Top Car Museums of 2016

Kevin WallisFunLeave a Comment

Looking back over the past year, it occurred to me just how many car museums I’d managed to visit during 2016. Amazingly my wife agreed to visit them all with me as part of our holidays, apart from the first (horses are more interesting, apparently) and last one as she’s been before. Starting in June and a rare opening of … Read More

The Mysterious Case of the ‘Engine-Stopping Ray’

Peter MerrittFunLeave a Comment

The Mysterious Case of the ‘Engine-Stopping Ray’ - A blog.

In Most Secret War, Dr. R. V. Jones discusses the human tendency to “conjure up fear under conditions of stress,” a tendency the modern Westerner—stalked by fears of terrorism, crime, and economic catastrophe, international mergers—will no doubt appreciate. The example Jones cites, though seemingly trivial in hindsight, is both entertaining and revealing. Bear with me on this one as it … Read More

Fortunate Correlations

Peter MerrittFunLeave a Comment

The more successful his efforts proved, the more pressure Dr. Jones and his team felt. He grew increasingly concerned that they would miss something vital. The most direct solution would be to hire more staff, which he considered, somewhat skeptically. Unfortunately, at that point all the ablest people had been fitted into posts, and it was now difficult to pries … Read More

The Problem of Playing It Safe

Peter MerrittFunLeave a Comment

This item challenges us to truly examine our motives in giving advice to clients (or colleagues). We may be working in high-tech IT, but we are still not all that far from our hunter-gatherer ancestors… As always, I am indebted to my colleagues both here and in the US professional gaming community for the inspiration and basis of this article. … Read More

Things that go FUD…(Fear, Uncertainty & Doubt)

Peter MerrittFunLeave a Comment

This item involves an illustration of some of the exaggerated and warped ‘group-think’ which was engendered by the famous V2 missile, the first man-made object into space. Whilst much of Jones’s comments in the article concern the missile, try to think of it in our terms as the next, fab solution/fad… As always, I am indebted to my colleagues both … Read More

AA – Abbreviations and Acronyms

Gil AthorayaFunLeave a Comment

Abbreviations and acronyms are great when you want to save space (or typing). There exists a plethora of commonly used abbreviations in most languages and most people recognise and read them without any problems. But how do you best shorten a new name or phrase? We have a collection of drug descriptions, typically not more than a dozen distinct items. … Read More

The Value of ‘Hierarchical Attenuation’

Peter MerrittFunLeave a Comment

In Reflections on Intelligence, R. V. Jones briefly reviews the British decision to adopt a convoy system during World War I. The case brings to light two useful insights: The Admiralty was dead set against a convoy system. One of their main arguments was that convoys would require an impractical number of escorts. They based their conclusion in part on … Read More

Historical Lessons for New Consultants

Peter MerrittFunLeave a Comment

This is the first in what may be an occasional series which seeks to make historical lessons more widely available to 21stC business. All of these are taken from the work of Dr R.V. Jones, a home-grown genius from WW2. I am indebted to some American colleagues involved with what is known as ‘red team’ training, the awkward squad developing … Read More